Order of the White Moon Goddess Gallery Proudly Presents

 

Rhiannon

 

Rita K.

All original material in this site is under copyright protection and is the intellectual property of the author.

This website created as a level one final project for

The Triple Moon School of the Feminine Divine

 

permission from amarantha@askyewolfe.com
 

 

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Background Information:

Rhiannon is a Celtic Goddess whose story is told in the Mabinogion, a cycle of Welsh legends collected circa 1400 but using much earlier material. She is a Goddess who chooses human form. Her name may be derived from two Welsh words: rhiain (maiden) and Annwn, the Welsh Otherworld, or from the ancient title Rigantona, 'Great Queen'.

She appears to Pwyll, Lord of Dyfed, in a magical place when she is dressed in dazzling gold, riding past him on a white horse. Day after day, Pwyll sends a man to follow her, but none can catch up with her. Finally he calls to her and she stops, informing him that she has chosen to marry him instead of her betrothed, Gwawl.

Her story continues with her being blamed for the death of her son, Pryderi, who has actually been spirited away, and suffering an unusual punishment: being forced to carry visitors to the court on her back, like a beast (horse) of burden.

She reappears in the Mabinogion married to Manawydan after the death of Pwyll. The realm of Dyfed falls under a devastating enchantment experienced by Rhiannon, Manawydan, Pryderi, and his wife Cigfa. The cause of the enchantment turns out to be revenge for Gwawl, Rhiannon's rejected suitor.

The two parts of the story are tied together by the mention of Rhiannon's magical singing birds, which have the power to heal and soothe.

 

 

What Is Sacred to Her:

The horse : representing power, fertility, instinct, death and transition, and a link between the Otherworld and the physical world.

Birds : hers have the power to awaken the dead and lull the living to sleep.

The colors gold and white : Rhiannon first appears dressed in gold, riding a white horse. Another part of the legend involves an encounter with a shining white boar and a beautiful, enchanted golden bowl.

The waxing moon : the Goddess's sudden appearance from the Otherworld suggests that she is a maiden ready for womanhood, corresponding to the waxing moon.

Music: her birds sing so sweetly that people abandon everything to listen to them.

 

Connecting with Rhiannon:

This is a ritual to use when you feel "stuck" in a situation and need help moving forward. As a Goddess in human form, Rhiannon is a highly intelligent, decisive, independent, and confident woman who goes after what she wants.

Need:

Yellow candle (holder & lighter)

Oil to anoint candle (any type)

Incense (thyme is suggested) & holder

White feather

Large plate (or large shallow dish)

Cup of water (enough to create a 'lake' of water on the plate)

Directions:

Dress the candle and place it in its holder on the altar.

Perform your preferred purification and grounding exercises.

Prepare sacred space.

Light the candle and invite Rhiannon into your sacred space.

Light the incense.

Pour the water onto the plate.

Bring to mind the situation that you feel is keeping you from moving forward. Feel Rhiannon's presence. Ask her to help you find the resolution you've been seeking.

Place the feather on the surface of the water, beside the rim of the plate close to you. Blow gently on the feather and watch it skim to the other side of the water. Just as swiftly will you move forward in your situation. You are no longer stuck in place. Just as lightly will you leave all obstacles behind.

Thank Rhiannon for the connection.

Open your circle of sacred space and ground your energy.

Allow the candle to burn down. You may pour out the water, but save the feather on your altar as a reminder of the impending change in your situation.

 

 

Bibliography:

Celtic Goddesses: Warriors, Virgins and Mothers by Miranda Green

Celtic Women's Spirituality: Accessing the Cauldron of Life by Edain McCoy

Ladies of the Lake by Caitlin and John Matthews

The Silver Wheel by Marguerite Elsbeth and Kenneth Johnson

http://www.mabinogion.info

http://www.timelessmyths.com/celtic/mabinogion.html

http://www.webmesh.co.uk/Mabinogionhomepage.htm

 

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